Paranormal Happenings

gr A very good friend of mine invited me on board to assist in the creative advances of their to-be magazine solely focused on the paranormal. This is something I have thought about doing a long time; my idea was to launch a magazine featuring photos and other media that is about the study of parapsychology and the fringe sciences. When my friend had offered, I humbly and swiftly accepted the offer. It was something that felt right from the moment he’d asked. When we get closer to a launch date, I will scratch in the details but for now, I am going to share a paranormal article with you I had scribed last year for the National Paranormal Society newsletter:

The legend of Gulf Road

In a town so humbled to play host to the creator of the Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum, it could come as no surprise that Chittenango has its own collection of paranormal stories and legends hidden beneath its yellow brick sidewalks and small town charm. Located in the heart of New York State, Chittenango by site is your average New England town filled with all of that homely attraction one would expect to find and as you travel down Lakeport road, you’ll be certain to drive over the Erie Canal bridge while heading towards North Chittenango—the Erie canal was the recent subject of author Anthony J. Gerst who authored ‘Ghosts of the Erie Canal’—its skeletons are still pretty visible.

Despite the ghosts said to travel along the canal; Chittenango plays host to another paranormal legend that exists in the form of cults and sacrifices.

In the early 1900’s cults would form in Chittenango village and travel by groups up to a road named Gulf Road which is this out-of-the-way road that sits hidden in a forest. It’s nearly moments outside of the village but once you begin down this road, you develop this eerie feeling that you are a million miles away, and nobody will hear you if you scream, and it appears just like that as on either end, you are surrounded by a hilly forest. At the end of the curvy, steep, stone and oil road stands a single home where the cult sacrifices would take place.

The belief is that these cults would gather at the house at the end of the road and sacrifice cats and even dogs. They would then wander into the forest surrounding Gulf road and taint its soil with the blood of the sacrificed animals while performing some various satanic rituals. In a section on the uppermost part of the road was the site where some cult members would display a severed head that appeared to be impaled into a stick to warn off intruders. Or so the legend claims …

During the 80’s and early 90’s, Chittenangoans would again report sightings of animals hung from trees and displayed in gruesome ways. The act wasn’t taken lightly as local police would investigate the area to uncover no evidence leading to any suspect. In fact, the police typically could never find any such thing except for crimson blood-like stains on trees and rocks.

Many Chittenangoans claim to have seen a burning cross within the woods along the curvy road. Some motorists have also seen a silhouette of a woman (sometimes just her shadow) and would find themselves in disbelief to discover no living person was present at the time of the sighting.

The woman is believed to be the spirit of 15 year old Violet Jean whom was found dead on side of the northern end of Gulf Road. Though no details are known about Violet’s death, people have suggested that she was a ritual sacrifice to summon demons.

Sometimes when you are out on the road in the thick of night, you just may see what will appear to be little specs of light weaving in and out of the thickness of trees, and you can even hear a bemoaning cat off in the distance and just as you think you’re just imagining things … you may find Violet walking towards you in your headlights. Ask anyone living in Chittenango and they will warn you not to travel the road, and if you must, don’t travel alone!

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